Hip / Pelvis Conditions

Hip / Pelvis Conditions

  • Piriformis Syndrome
  • Greater Trochanteric Bursitis
  • Labrum Tear
  • Ischial Bursitis

Piriformis Syndrome

Overview

The piriformis is a muscle that extends from the front of the sacrum. That’s the triangle-shaped bone between your two hipbones in your pelvis. The muscle extends across the sciatic nerve to the top of the femur. The femur is the large bone in your upper leg.

The piriformis helps the thigh move side to side. A piriformis muscle spasm can put pressure on the sciatic nerve and cause symptoms. The result is piriformis syndrome.

 

Symptoms

Sciatica is the main symptom of piriformis syndrome. You may experience others, however. Often the discomfort is felt in another part of the body, such as the back of the leg. This is known as referred pain.

Some other common signs of piriformis syndrome include:

  • numbness and tingling in the buttocks that may extend down the back of the leg
  • tenderness of the muscles in the buttocks
  • difficulty sitting comfortably
  • pain while sitting that gets worse the longer you sit
  • pain in the buttocks and legs that worsens with activity

 

Treatment

Piriformis syndrome often doesn’t need any treatment. Rest and avoiding activities that trigger your symptoms are usually the first approaches to take.

You may feel better if you alternate ice and heat on your buttocks or legs. Wrap an ice pack in a thin towel so you don’t have the ice pack directly touching your skin. Keep the ice on for 15 to 20 minutes. Then use a heating pad on a low setting for about the same time. Try that every few hours to help relieve the pain.

Greater Trochanteric Bursitis

Overview

Generally refers to pain in the sacroiliac joint region that is caused by abnormal motion in the sacroiliac joint, either too much motion or too little motion. It typically results in inflammation of the sacroiliac joint, and can be debilitating.

 

Symptoms

The main symptom of trochanteric bursitis is pain in the outer part of the hip. You may feel soreness when you press on the outside of your hip or lie on that side. The pain will get worse with activities such as walking or climbing stairs. Pain can also spread, or radiate, down your thigh.

At first, the pain may be sharp. Eventually, it can fade into an ache.

You might also have swelling in the affected leg.

 

Treatment

Avoiding the activity that caused trochanteric bursitis will give your hip time to heal. You can also try one of these treatments to bring down inflammation and relieve pain:

  • Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Ibuprofen (Motrin, Advil) and naproxen (Naprosyn) can help control inflammation and pain. Because NSAIDs can cause side effects like stomach pain and bleeding, use them for the shortest possible amount of time needed.
  • Steroid injections. Your doctor can give you injections of a corticosteroid medicine to bring down inflammation and control pain.
  • Physical therapy. A physical therapist can teach you exercises to maintain strength and flexibility in your hip. The therapist might also use other treatments, such as massage, ultrasound, ice, or heat.
  • Assistive devices. Use a cane or crutches to take weight off your hip while it heals

Labrum Tear

Overview

The labral tear of the hip involves the ring of cartilage (labrum) that is on the outer edge of the hip joint cavity. In addition to cushioning the hip joint, the labrum acts as a seal or rubber gasket to help hold the head of the femur (located at its upper end) securely within the acetabulum.

 

Symptoms

Many tears of the labral of the hip do not cause signs or symptoms. However, sometimes you may have one or more of these sensations:

A feeling of blockage, crunching or stuck in the hip joint
Pain in the hip or groin
Rigidity or limited range of motion in the hip joint

 

Treatment

Tears of the labral of the hip are usually associated with the practice of sports. If the sport you practice exerts a lot of pressure on the hip, condition the nearby muscles with strength and flexibility exercises. Avoid putting all the weight of the body on the hip when the legs are positioned at the extremes of the normal range of motion.

Ischial Bursitis

Overview

Ischial bursitis, also known as Ischiogluteal bursitis or Weaver’s bottom is a rare and infrequently recognized bursitis of the buttock region.[3] It’s one of the four types of hip bursitis. The bursitis is mainly due to chronic and continuous irritation of the bursa and occurs most often in individuals who have a sedentary life.