Hand / Wrist Conditions

Hand / Wrist Conditions

  • De Quervain’s Tenosynovitis
  • Trigger Finger
  • Ganglion Cyst

De Quervain’s Tenosynovitis

Overview

De Quervain syndrome is inflammation of two tendons that control movement of the thumb and their tendon sheath. This results in pain at the outside of the wrist. Pain is typically increased with gripping or rotating the wrist. The thumb may also be difficult to move smoothly. Onset of symptoms is gradual.

 

Symptoms

Symptoms are pain at the radial side of the wrist, spasms, tenderness, occasional burning sensation in the hand, and swelling over the thumb side of the wrist, and difficulty gripping with the affected side of the hand. The onset is often gradual. Pain is made worse by movement of the thumb and wrist, and may radiate to the thumb or the forearm.

 

Treatment

Palliative treatments include a splint that immobilized the wrist and the thumb to the interphalangeal joint and anti-inflammatory medication or acetaminophen. Systematic review and meta-analysis do not support the use of splinting over steroid injections.

Trigger Finger

Overview

Stenosing tenosynovitis is a condition commonly known as “trigger finger.” It is sometimes also called “trigger thumb.” The tendons that bend the fingers glide easily with the help of pulleys. These pulleys hold the tendons close to the bone.

 

Symptoms

Trigger finger may start with discomfort felt at the base of the finger or thumb, where the finger joins the palm. This area is often sensitive to pressure. You might feel a lump there. Other symptoms may include:

  • Pain
  • Popping
  • Catching feeling
  • Limited finger movement

 

Treatment

The goal of treatment in trigger finger is to eliminate the swelling and catching/locking, allowing full, painless movement of the finger or thumb.

Common treatments include, but are not limited to:

  • Night splints
  • Anti-inflammatory medication
  • Changing your activity
  • Steroid injection

Ganglion Cyst

Overview

Ganglion cysts are very common lumps within the hand and wrist that occur adjacent to joints or tendons.

 

Symptoms

 

Treatment

Treatment can often be non-surgical. In many cases, these cysts can simply be observed, especially if they are painless, as they frequently disappear spontaneously. If the cyst becomes painful, limits activity, or is otherwise unacceptable, several treatment options are available.

The use of splints and anti-inflammatory medication can be prescribed in order to decrease pain associated with activities.

However, severe cases of low back pain can’t always be fixed by lifestyle changes. If your lower back pain interferes with your ability to perform everyday activities, talk to your doctor.